Posted by: baworldtraveler | August 29, 2011

Irene Unleashes Furry on Catskills, NY and Vermont. Covered Bridges Not Spared.

Irene has come and gone. I am happy to report I was merely inconvenienced by a day and a half without power.  Low lying areas in my town and neighboring towns around the county were once again flooded – but we all  knew that would happen. They are the places that always flood when there is a lot of rain – no hurricane needed.

When I was finally able to tune into some reporting on the storm’s damage, I was shocked to see the footage of flooding and damage in the Catskills. Towns destroyed. Someone on one of the news reports said that the volume of water flow was greater than that of the flow of water falling over Niagara Falls.

Margaretville, NY it by 16 feet of water. See video of Main Street rescue at http://upstater.net/tag/flooding-catskills-irene/.

Vermont, famous for its covered bridges, was no exception. Sadly, covered bridges fell victim to the flooding. They were not spared.

Some ABC footage of the Catskill and Vermont flooding (including the destruction of one of its covered bridges) can be found at http://abcnews.go.com/US/video/hurricane-irene-washes-catskills-town-upstate-york-14402964.

A NY Times article at http://dotearth.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/08/29/irenes-rain-impacts-come-as-u-s-cuts-flood-tracking-technology/ says, “As all of this is playing out, Congress is steadily trimming the budget for maintaining stream-flow gauges and other monitoring efforts aimed at forecasting flood threats. More on that below.

In Vermont, the rain from Irene was less severe but the steep-sloped topography produced destructive flash floods. The event is no match for the state’s “flood of record,” which was spawned by the remnants of a late-season tropical storm in 1927. Here’s a remarkable assemblage of archival film (from the Vermont Historical Society) documenting that event:”  

Be sure to scroll down the article to see the video of 1927 Vermont  flooding.

I don’t know how people and towns recover from such utter devastation. We should keep their situation in mind when you think you are having a bad day to provide some perspective.

My heart goes out to all those still crippled by Irene. Goodnight Irene.

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